Stefano’s Stuffs

Vmware ESX ethernet problem after “migration”

Generally, the command “migrate” of the Vmware Infrastructure Client is a very safe operation and you can move completely one virtual machine from one ESX server to another in few steps and few minutes.
The n.1 error that could happen is that the single virtual ethernet controller eth0 is “disappeared” after migration and your machine lost its ip address.
The solution, in my cases (on a Suse 10.1 with only one ethernet), was always the same:
go to /etc/sysconfig/network
locate a file similiar to ifcfg-eth-id-XX:XX… that’s related to the old mac address of eth0
rename it to ifcfg-eth0 (with mv command)
go to /etc/udev/rules.d
edit a file named 30-net_persistent_names
inside there are X lines where X is the number of your eth devices (old, new, used, unused…); in a default situation there are two lines, one old related to eth0 and one new related to eth1
delete the line related to the same old mac address you saw before (related to eth0 as you can see at the end of that line) and change from eth1 to eth0 in the remaining line, that’s the one containing the new mac of your ethernet card.
Save and reboot.Now your eth0 should be ok as in the past.

Generally, the command “migrate” of the Vmware Infrastructure Client is a very safe operation and you can move completely one virtual machine from one ESX server to another one in few steps and few minutes.

The n.1 error that could happen is that the single virtual ethernet controller eth0 is “disappeared” after migration and your machine lost its ip address (and this could be REALLY dramatic).

The solution, in my cases (on a Suse 10.1 with only one ethernet), was always the same:

go to /etc/sysconfig/network

locate a file similiar to ifcfg-eth-id-XX:XX… that’s related to the old mac address of eth0

rename it simply to ifcfg-eth0 (with mv command)

go to /etc/udev/rules.d

edit a file named 30-net_persistent_names

inside there are X lines where X is the number of your eth devices (old, new, used, unused…); in a default situation there are two lines, one old for eth0 and one new for a new created eth1

delete the first line that includes the same old mac address you saw before (related to eth0 as you can see at the end of that line) and change from eth1 to eth0 in the remaining line, that’s the one containing the new mac of your ethernet card.

Save and reboot.Now your eth0 should be ok as in the past.

Advertisements

August 25, 2009 - Posted by | computer | , , , , , , , ,

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: